Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

Professor Tom Schuller has held a range of positions in the field of lifelong learning. From 2008-2010, he directed the independent Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning, sponsored by the UK’s National Institute of Adult and Continuing Education.  With David Watson he co-authored the Inquiry’s main report, Learning Through Life.  From 2003-2008 he was Head of the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) at OECD, the Paris-based international think tank, with responsibility for CERI’s projects relating to some 30 countries. Before that Tom was Dean of the Faculty of Continuing Education and Professor of Lifelong Learning at Birkbeck, University of London; and co-director of the Research Centre on the Wider Benefits of Learning. He chairs the Governing Board of the Working Men’s College in London, Europe’s oldest adult education institute.  He is currently writing a book on The Paula Principle – why working women tend to stick below their competence level. Tom is the main editor of the forthcoming 3rd GRALE report – the Global Report on Adult Learning, published by Unesco’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Keynote Speakers

Professor Soonghee Han is professor of Lifelong Education in the Department of Education, Seoul National University, the Republic of Korea. He is currently the President of the Korean Society of the Studies in Lifelong Education, and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Lifelong Learning Society published in Korea, and also editorial board member of Journal of Adult and Continuing Education (University of Glasgow). He was the founding coordinator of the RN5, ASEM LLL. He has actively collaborated with European scholars in this field. He has received the Visiting Scholarship Fund from MALLL program of Aarhus University. He has studied historical and cultural patterns of East Asian adult education and lifelong learning practices, and has been invited as a guest professor by the Nagoya University (Japan, 2015), University of Tokyo (Japan, 2012), and Zhejiang University (China, 2011).

His academic works focus on studies on the emergence of the lifelong learning system and the learning society as it social representation.  His research interests cover the follow areas: learning cooperatives and democratic citizenship education: higher lifelong learning as a complex system and structural changes of HEIs for universal access to higher education; East Asian origins of lifelong learning; the educational system as self-referential complex system.

Keynote Speakers

Professor Karen Evans is currently Coordinator of the ASEM Lifelong Learning Hub Research Network on Workplace Learning. She is Emeritus Professor of Education at the UCL Institute of Education, University of London and Honorary Professor in the Economic and Social Research Council LLAKES Centre for Learning and Life Chances. She is also Honorary Professor at RMIT University, Australia. She was previously Head of the School of Lifelong Education and International Development in the Institute of Education and subsequently research professor, working on research interests in life and work transitions, and learning in and through the workplace. She has directed major studies of learning and work in Britain and internationally. Her recent publications include the books Youth and Work Transitions in Changing Social Landscapes (2013), The Sage Handbook of Workplace Learning (2011); Improving Literacy at Work (2011); Learning, Work and Social Responsibility: Challenges for Lifelong Learning in Global Age (2009). She is joint editor of the Second International Handbook of Lifelong Learning, 2012 and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Keynote Speakers

Professor Andy Furlong is Professor of Social Inclusion and Education within the Robert Owen Centre, School of Education and Dean of Research of the College of Social Sciences, University of Glasgow. His research interests revolve around the experiences of young people in education and their transitions from education to employment. His work covers processes of social reproduction, inequality, mobility, exclusion and inclusion and social justice. From a sociological perspective, his research has focused on patterns of educational participation and forms of engagement, educational and occupational aspirations, higher education, informal education and training. His research has involved regular collaboration with colleagues in Europe, Australia and Japan. He has held visiting positions at Deakin, Melbourne and Monash in Australia, and held an Invitation Fellowship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He is an advisor to the Japanese Youth Cohort Survey team.

Comments on content:
Revised 13.11.2018